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Same-Day Services

Camden, NJ
Junk Removal

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Camden, NJ Junk Removal

No Job too BIG or too SMALL

Junk Rescue is committed to providing Camden, New Jersey a stress-free and complete NJ junk removal. By offering same-day next-day junk removal service we’re able to ensure your needs are met in a flash! Our team of Junk Removal heroes are ready to put in the work when you need us the most. You can rest assured that Junk Rescue is always up to the task. Know the saying, “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure”? Once we remove the items from your home our top priority is to donate the items on your behalf to local charities. Any item that is not accepted by one of our donation partners will be recycled and disposed of properly.

NJ Junk Removal -Junk Rescue Worker

Same Day Junk Removal In Camden,NJ

At Junk Rescue, we offer affordable Junk Removal services In Camden for all your cleanup-project and moving needs. The best part is you won’t have to lift a finger. Just sit back, relax, and watch our heroes handle the task!

Camden JUNK REMOVAL
WHAT WE TAKE

Save $10 on Same Day Service

5,000+ Happy Clients

We always strive to deliver 100% client satisfaction with every job.

5-Star Reviews

We do whatever it takes to fulfill our clients needs.

Responsible Disposal

All items that cannot be donated will be recycled and disposed.

New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the Northeastern United States. It is bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by Delaware Bay and the State of Delaware. New Jersey is the fourth-smallest state by area but the 11th-most populous, with 8,882,190 residents as of 2019 and an area of 8,722.58 square miles, making it the most densely populated of the 50 U.S. states. Its largest city is Newark. All but one county in New Jersey lie within the combined statistical areas of New York City or Philadelphia. New Jersey was the second-wealthiest U.S. state by median household income as of 2017.

New Jersey was first inhabited by Native Americans for at least 2,800 years, with the Lenape being the dominant group by the time Europeans arrived in the early 17th century. The Dutch and the Swedes founded the first European settlements in the state. The English later seized control of the region, naming it the Province of New Jersey after the largest of the Channel Islands, Jersey, and granting it as a colony to Sir George Carteret and John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton. New Jersey was the site of several important battles during the American Revolutionary War in the 18th century.

In the 19th century, factories in the “Big Six” cities of Camden, Paterson, Newark, Trenton, Jersey City, and Elizabeth helped drive the Industrial Revolution. New Jersey’s location at the center of the Northeast megalopolis—between Boston and New York City to the northeast, and Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., to the southwest—fueled its rapid growth and suburbanization in the second half of the 20th century. At the turn of the 21st century, the state’s culturally diverse populace began reverting toward more urban settings within the state, with towns home to commuter rail stations outpacing the population growth of more automobile-oriented suburbs since 2008.

As of 2020, New Jersey was home to the highest number of millionaires per capita of all U.S. states, with 9.76% of households (more than 323,000 of 3.3 million statewide) meeting the criteria. New Jersey’s public school system consistently ranks at or among the top of all fifty U.S. states.

Waste management (or waste disposal) includes the activities and actions required to manage waste from its inception to its final disposal. This includes the collection, transport, treatment and disposal of waste, together with monitoring and regulation of the waste management process.

Waste can be solid, liquid, or gas and each type has different methods of disposal and management. Waste management deals with all types of waste, including industrial, biological and household. In some cases, waste can pose a threat to human health. Health issues are associated throughout the entire process of waste management. Health issues can also arise indirectly or directly. Directly, through the handling of said waste, and indirectly through the consumption of water, soil and food. Waste is produced by human activity, for example, the extraction and processing of raw materials. Waste management is intended to reduce adverse effects of waste on human health, the environment or aesthetics.

Waste management practices are not uniform among countries (developed and developing nations); regions (urban and rural areas), and residential and industrial sectors can all take different approaches.

Proper management of waste is important for building sustainable and livable cities, but it remains a challenge for many developing countries and cities. Effective waste management is quite expensive, usually comprising 20%–50% of municipal budgets. Operating this essential municipal service requires integrated systems that are efficient, sustainable, and socially supported. In view of this, the World Bank finances and advises on solid waste management projects using a diverse suite of products and services, including traditional loans, results-based financing, development policy financing, and technical advisory. World Bank-financed waste management projects usually address the entire lifecycle of waste right from the point of generation to collection and transportation, and finally treatment and disposal. A large portion of waste management practices deal with municipal solid waste (MSW) which is the bulk of the waste that is created by household, industrial, and commercial activity.